July Accountability and Allotment News

Unfashionable late as usual, but here are the numbers plus some really good news:

June (donations) and July (costs) of running my, not so little anymore, neighbourhood pantry:

Summary

Donations leftover from the previous month: 195,75 Euros

Donations received in June: 811,83

Costs of buying supplies (food and basic cleaning supplies) for the neighbourhood pantry July 2022: 829,18 Euros

Carry over to August: + 178,40 Euros

Link to receipts: (This is a ZIP folder, I am on a Mac and take cybersecurity seriously, but please, still scan it before unzipping, it’s just good practice πŸ˜‰

Also, forgot to mention it last month, I still have 300 Euros of ’emergency cash’ in storage, so all good for the foreseeable future!

Three good news to share:

I will go away for a few days this week to visit friends in Portugal and recharge my batteries. I plan to cuddle their two dogs until they bark for mercy πŸ˜‰ One of my neighbours will take on the distribution of the things in the pantry, so nobody will be in distress whilst I am gone.

I have a new allotment, slightly farer away than I like (~3km) but it comes with no strings attached, so basically I can do whatever I like with it. Because of the distance I think I will mostly concentrate on fruit trees, berry shrubs and the like, at least for this year. I will also ask some of my neighbours if they would like to help. Any surplus product will go to any project that helps with food insecurity here in Santiago.

I did run a very successful fundraiser on Facebook for Saint James’ Day, so the shelves will be continued to be stocked for a long time, which gives me incredible peace of mind!

That’s all, for now, big abrazos (hugs) from Santiago, SY

PS Forgot to add, my landlord allowed me to put up a third shelf (for clothing, shoes and other useful small items). So happy!

Adios Allotment and Accountability

Just to mix up things a bit, first a few updates of what has going on lately in my life and then the numbers.

Adios Allotment

Sadly, I lost the allotment. I am still very furious about how I and two of my friends here (Tim and Maggie) have been taken for a ride, so I try to keep this story short and as neutral as possible. Basically the people who hold the paperwork for the allotment (I only had a verbal agreement with them) waited until most of the clearing work (lots of brambles!) was done and then gave it to somebody else, destroying at least 50% of what I had planted already in the process. I am still too furious to write a blog post about this but the good news is that I might have a new allotment soon, I will keep you posted.

May/June Accountability

Once again many days late, but here are the numbers for May (donations) and June (costs) of running my little neighbourhood pantry:

Donations leftover from the previous month: – 128,09 Euros

Donations received in May: 983,57 Euros

Costs of buying supplies (food, basic cleaning supplies plus a bottle of gas to cook the food for one of the families) for the neighbourhood pantry June 2022: 659,73 Euros

Carry over to July: 195,75 Euros

That is how the shelves typically look on a Monday (photo taken this week), by the weekend they are nearly empty. Sorry once again for the bad image quality!

Link to receipts: (This is a ZIP folder, I am on a Mac and take cybersecurity seriously, but please, still scan it before unzipping, it’s just good practice πŸ˜‰

The biggest donation came in via a pilgrim that did a ‘fundraising pilgrimage’ for three good causes here in Santiago, my pantry being one of them.

Also, I had now quite a few pilgrims and/or friends visiting my little pantry and bringing in kind donations. I am always happy to show any- and everybody my little set-up, chat about my neighbours and perhaps you will even meet them. Just contact me a bit beforehand to make sure I am at home.

Too hot to type more, as we are experience a heatwave here in Spain, currently 34C in my flat, but a little advance warning: I will run another Facebook fundraiser this coming weekend to keep the shelves stocked and to provide a bit of extra cheer aka Tartas de Santiago etc for my neighbours. This is an ongoing need.

As always, if you have any questions/comments, please leave them here on the blog!

I am also awaiting the delivery of another shelf (for clothing, shoes and other small, useful items) to be put up on the ground floor. I solemnly promised my landlord it will be the last one πŸ˜‰

Big abrazos (hugs) from Santiago and stay safe and cool wherever you are, SY

May Accountability

May 2022 Donations and Costs

Sorry, again a few days late, but here are the numbers for April (donations) and May (costs):

Summary

Donations leftover from the previous month: 170,80 Euros

Donations received in April: 495,67 Euros

Costs of buying supplies (food, basic cleaning supplies plus a bottle of gas to cook the food for one of the families) for the neighbourhood pantry May 2022: 794,56 Euros

Carry over to June: – 128,09 Euros

Link to receipts: (This is a ZIP folder, I am on a Mac and take cybersecurity seriously, but please, still scan it before unzipping, it’s just good practice πŸ˜‰

Sorry if this a very short blog post, feeling a bit under the weather right now. As soon as I can I will write up another one with updates on what is going on in my life here in Santiago. And also sorry for the following repeat of what I wrote in an earlier post:

If you want to donate to something specifically, just put a note against it or contact me if you have any special question/idea.

The receipts are now all ‘neighbourhood pantry’ only. The little I need for myself I can go easily shopping on foot for myself. So, less confusion for everybody and more exercise for me!

And yes, there is still a tiny bit of overlap between the pantry and my own supplies. If I forgot to buy tomato sauce for myself, I grab one from the pantry shelves, if my neighbours run out of toilet paper on a Sunday afternoon, I split what I have in the ‘penthouse’ with them. There will be always this kind of overlap, but I keep it to the bare minimum and make sure it balances out both ways. Like I said before, for me it’s not about charity but about sharing what I have and what I can fundraise for with your help.

The ’emergency fund’ of just over 300 Euros (should I need it aka if things are really going haywire/south here in Europe) is still intact, lets pray for peace and less raise in prices (worldwide!).

If you want to contribute to what I do, two very important points first:

Please don’t give more than you can easily afford.

Please don’t give any amount that you wanted already to give to another project.

Said all this, I could never have done all this without the help of all of you scattered around the whole world. So a huge MUCHAS GRACIAS to all of you!

And a last, big Mea Culpa, I know I am horribly bad in keeping up with my email inbox, so if I haven’t acknowledged your donation, please drop me a note in the comments here and I will get to it ASAP.

Also, if you have any questions and/or need clarification about anything, just do the same.

Plus, if you are in Santiago, I am always happy to show you the pantry and chat about my neighbours.

Big abrazos (hugs) from Santiago, SY

April Accountability

Sorry, a few days late, but here are the numbers for March (donations) and April (costs):

Summary

Donations leftover from the previous month: 342,53 Euros

Donations received in March: 407,73 Euros

Costs of buying and distributing things for and via my neighbourhood pantry and fledgling solidarity garden in April 2022: 579,46 Euros

Carry over to May: 170,80 Euros

Link to receipts:

(This is a ZIP folder, I am on a Mac and take cybersecurity seriously, but please, still scan it before unzipping, it’s just good practice πŸ˜‰

Fully stocked pantry this Monday, the ‘temperature sensitive’ things are upstairs in my fridge and freezer.

Apart of a short mention on a forum and this blog https://egeria.house/moving-easter-cheer-and-updates/ that I wanted to provide a little extra ‘Easter Cheer’ for my neighbours I didn’t do any fundraising in March as I had enough to stock up the pantry πŸ˜‰ I received a few dedicated donations to that so that there was plenty of chocolate for both adults and kids for Easter. Plus a fluffy soft toy for the little girl born in January! Thank you all so much for that!

So if you want to donate to something specifically, just put a note against it or contact me if you have any special question/idea.

The receipts for April are now all ‘neighbourhood pantry’ only. The little I need for myself I can go easily shopping on foot for myself. So, less confusion for everybody and more exercise for me!

And yes, there is still a tiny bit of overlap between the pantry and my own supplies. If I forgot to buy tomato sauce for myself, I grab one from the pantry shelves, if my neighbours run out of toilet paper on a Sunday afternoon, I split what I have in the ‘penthouse’ with them. There will be always this kind of overlap, but I keep it to the bare minimum and make sure it balances out both ways. Like I said before, for me it’s not about charity but about sharing what I have and what I can fundraise for with your help.

The ’emergency fund’ of just over 300 Euros (should I need it aka if things are really going haywire/south here in Europe) is still intact, lets pray for peace and less raise in prices (worldwide!).

Two more updates:

The original tenants https://www.facebook.com/CaminoCompanions/ of the ‘balcony flat’ are back and, in exchange for one of the neighboours exchanging also their gas bottle will contribute, in kind, to the pantry. Thank you for coffee, sisters!

Garden/Allotment – OOPS! Between moving, having a few not so great days (including a minor accident) and meeting up with pilgrim friends both old and new, I have done very little in the garden lately. Tomorrow two dear friends will be visiting both the pantry and the allotment and I will see how bad the (weed) damage is …

If you want to contribute to what I do, two very important points first:

  • Please don’t give more than you can easily afford.
  • Please don’t give any amount that you wanted already to give to another project.

Said all this, I could never have done all this without the help of all of you scattered around the whole world. So a huge MUCHAS GRACIAS to all of you!

And a last, once again, a big Mea Culpa, I know I am horribly bad in keeping up with my email inbox, so if I haven’t acknowledged your donation, please drop me a note in the comments here and I will get to it ASAP.

Also, if you have any questions and/or need clarification about anything, just do the same.

Plus, if you are in Santiago, I am always happy to show people the pantry and allotment (if you like weeding, even the better πŸ˜‰ – just kidding! All with no strings attached!

Big abrazos (hugs) from Santiago, SY

Moving, Easter Cheer and Updates

I have decided to refer from now on to my new flat as the ‘penthouse’ as that sounds more positive than third or top floor flat πŸ˜‰ It’s obviously not a real penthouse, but I plan to make it ‘my space’. I still need to get some bits and pieces to achieve that but I am sure I will seen think of it as my home.

Yes, I am now living at the very top πŸ˜‰

So here a random list of updates how things are going in my life and in Santiago/Spain/the Camino in general:

Pantry

One side effect of the move upstairs was that I had to move my little neighbourhood pantry to the ground floor. I will be forever grateful to my landlord for allowing me to do this! And another big Thank You to Lea and Dan from Canada that helped me get all downstairs and to re-construct the shelves.I am also very happy that the pantry is now a full ‘choice pantry’ from where people can simply take what they need. How it works now is like this:

Doorbell rings, I grab the things I have for them in the fridge and go down and open the door. We chat for a little bit whilst the neighbour fills her or his bag. I take the ‘fridge things’ that weren’t required back up.

Also sorting out my twice weekly deliveries has become much easier. The only things I need to carry upstairs now are those that go in fridge or freezer compartment. The rest gets directly, yes, with first in, first out, in mind, into the shelves.

And one more thing, I don’t know exactly why, but since this is in place, people are far more conscious what they need and when. Perhaps seeing what is available for the week and knowing that they are not the only ones that need the pantry helps with that.

Sorry about the bad image quality! This is how the ground floor looks like now (no worries, nobody lives in the ground floor flat, it’s used as storage area.

Easter Cheer

Easter is very much still a religious festival here in Spain, with solemn processions and services. I am very glad about that! But I also thought that in these difficult times everybody deserves a bit of ‘extra Easter Cheer’, especially the kids! So, thanks to some extra donations, I was able to get some chocolate goodies and, for the 3 month old baby girl, a nice plush toy, found some of my baskets, filled them and prepared this box for the families:

Move

Moving is always stressful, but this move was even more stressful as I had to try two remember which tea towel belonged to which household πŸ˜‰ Remember, I was only the subtenant in the ‘balcony flat’ and it was basically fully equipped with all that was needed. Add to that my own stuff like books, plants etc. you imagine that it was pretty crowded! But poco a poco, little by little, I made progress. My neighbours came every afternoon for three days to help me to carry stuff up and Sister Alicia from the Camino Compagnons https://www.facebook.com/CaminoCompanions/ helped me on Thursday to get the last of my things upstairs. And then the unpacking and finding the right place for everything started…

Flat

Whilst the flat has no outdoor space like a balcony or a terrace, it’s growing quickly on me! I have a large kitchen with plenty of windows (and window sills for the plants) that has gorgeous views over the city. From here I can even see the clock tower or Berenguela of the cathedral with its ‘pilgrim lantern’ that is lit at night in the Holy Years to guide pilgrims to the cathedral. As the kitchen has also enough space, and the best views, I decided to use it also as my workspace for writing etc.

Ok, not the best photo I have ever taken, but the Pilgrim Lantern is the light on the left tower of the Cathedral.

The hallway is long and spacious and has two storage areas, one I am using for more plants (there is a surprise πŸ˜‰ ) and on the other end are some build in shelves that I plan to use as a storage area for in kind donations like clothes, shoes and the like for my neighbours.

The blue fairy lights from the balcony work indoors as well πŸ˜‰

And there is also a small living room that I plan to use both as reading room for me and as ‘absolute emergency accommodation’ for pilgrims in need. Plus my own, big bedroom and a nicely spacious bathroom.

Pilgrims

Over 37.000 pilgrims have arrived so far this year here in Santiago and got registered by the Pilgrim’s Office. That are the record numbers we had expected, pre-pandemic, for a Holy Year. Like in other Holy Years, a lot of these record numbers were created by large, religious groups mainly from Spain itself, but also from Portugal and Italy. And pilgrims that walk/bike solo alone or in small Camino families, are mostly from continental Europe. Oversea pilgrims have returned to the Camino, but not, yet, in the numbers we had in previous years. A lot of things have changed on the Camino but another aspect to consider when planning your Camino are budget and:

Prices

Like pretty much everywhere else, prices have gone up considerably here in Spain, here a few examples from my own experience and at the end two links to more information. The first article is from before the war in Ukraine started, the second after it started. It’s easy to see how this war is already affecting all of us …

When I moved into the house the orange ‘bombona’ containing gas used for cooking and heating costed around 13,00 Euros, now it’s 19,70.

Last year I could buy 1 litre of full fat UHT milk for 60 cents, now the same milk costs 75 cents.

And, compared to the same month last year, my own electricity bill has nearly doubled.

But perhaps the best example to show how the war in Ukraine affects us all is the price of sunflower oil.

Before the war 1 litre was around 1,20 Euros, now it’s 3,20 Euros. Sunflower oil is used by low income families that can’t afford the more expensive olive oil and also for frying by a number of restaurants and the like.

Here some more examples:

https://www.thelocal.es/20220114/the-food-and-drink-that-are-more-expensive-than-ever-in-spain/

https://www.euractiv.com/section/politics/short_news/spain-sees-historic-inflation-rate-as-energy-prices-increase/

All this now filters down, slowly and steadily, on the Camino. Accommodation and food prices have already risen as have prices for pilgrim’s menus and the like in some places. First the increased costs (masks, extra cleaning material, hand sanitizer) due to the pandemic and now increased costs of energy and produce leave most business owners no other choice than to increase their prices too.

So, in summary, if you want to walk/bike a Camino this year you need to budget for higher costs and accept that there will be a lot of pilgrims with you on the way.

Garden/Allotment

Because of the move and getting the flat ready for the sisters plus decluttering my own belongings I have to confess that the allotment got sadly neglected and some, but not all thankfully, of the weeds have grown back.

So from now on, the garden will be on the top of my to-do list, meaning gardening on rain-free days and writing on rainy days. And yes, I had already help to coming so far! If you are in Santiago and fancy some weeding or simply hanging out in the garden, just contact me!

I think that’s all from me for now. If you have any questions or remarks, please leave them in the comments.

Muchas gracias und hugs from Santiago,

SY

March Accountability

I actually found it really helpful to finally write up this blog post, this way I also see where the money goes exactly to. For simplicity’s sake I have divided it up in three parts:

Shovel and seeds for my little solidarity garden project πŸ˜‰
  • Very Short Summary (at the end is the link to the receipts I have).
  • Detailed Summary
  • Outlook to the Future

Very Short Summary

Donations leftover from previous months: ~1,100 Euros

Costs of buying supplies for my neighbourhood pantry and fledgling solidarity garden in March 2022: 757,47 Euros

Carry over to April: 342,53 Euros

Link to receipts:

(This is a ZIP folder, I am on a Mac and take cybersecurity seriously, but please, still scan it before unzipping, it’s just good practice πŸ˜‰

Detailed Summary

Towards the end of February I run a birthday fundraiser (now closed) for my neighbourhood pantry on Facebook but you can see it still here: https://www.facebook.com/donate/2428844467245911/ A few donations came also in via Paypal. So, whilst some of this arrived in March, I decided, again for simplicity’s sake, to bundle it all up into February. I haven’t kept any receipts until after the first week of March (sorry about that, will do better in future!), so the ‘carry over’ of ~1,100 Euros donations is a realistic estimate only, as I also spend some of the money on the pantry and garden in the last week of February and the first week of March.

I received one dedicated donation for gardening tools and seeds, so if you want to donate to something specifically, just put a note against it.

Receipts, there are two missing for March, one is for 3 Euros to buy non-prescription medicine for one of the families, the second is for my first online order in March for 76,78 Euros.

All other expenses are documented in the attached files (see above) and I have taken out the items I purchased for me personally.

Here is a summary list of what I have spend your donations on (Froiz, Dia and Gadiz are our local supermarkets btw):

76,78 Euros Food & Basics Froiz, no PDF receipt

114,37 Euros Food & Basics Froiz

3 Euros Medication

19,70 Euros Cooking gas for one family

133,17 Euros Food & Basics Froiz

3,06 Euros Dia Stock-up

95 Euros 5x Fruit and Vegetable Box from https://www.facebook.com/aHortadaAvoa

149.17 Euros Food & Basics Froiz

21,90 Euros Gardening Tools

29,08 Euros Vegetable Seeds

3,06 Euros Gadiz Stock-up

9,90 Euros More gardening tools πŸ˜‰

3,14 Euros Dia Stock-up

96,14 Euros Food & Basics Froiz

I also received a big in-kind donation consisting of two big shopping bags full of food (lots of lentils and peas!).

Plus I have access to an ’emergency fund’ of just over 300 Euros should I need it aka if things are really going haywire/south here in Europe. But if that doesn’t happen, we hope and pray for it!, the money will go back to the donor.

Outlook to the Future

Like pretty much everywhere else, prices are going sharply and steadily up and nobody knows how everything will play out in the end. As long as I can, I will help my neighbours, because for me it’s not about charity but about sharing what I have and what I can fundraise for, with your help.

If you want to contribute to this, two very important points first:

Please don’t give more than you can easily afford.

Please don’t give anything that you wanted already to give to another project.

Said all this, I could never have done all this without the help of all of you scattered around the whole world. So a huge MUCHAS GRACIAS to all of you!

And a last, big Mea Culpa: I know I am horribly bad in keeping up with my email inbox, so if I haven’t acknowledged your donation, please drop me a note in the comments here and I will get to it ASAP.

Also, if you have any questions and/or need clarification about anything, just do the same.

Big abrazos (hugs) from Santiago, SY

I am off to a good start!

I have to admit that my first thought, when seeing my allotment, was β€œWhere do I even start?”. But with the help of both old and new friends my little ‘solidarity garden’ project is off to a good start!

Yesterday

So, as the rain stopped I went down with my shovel and some other useful things to just have a go at it. Poco a poco / One step at a time. I started by identifying plants that would be worth keeping and getting rid of weeds. Slowly I ‘liberated’ what is now known as the strawberry patch.

Soon Tim joined me and helped weeding more whilst I was cutting down the two blackberry/bramble shrubs that had overtaken much of the plot. Sounds of ‘OUCH’ were frequently heard from both of us πŸ˜‰

And then a miracle happened: 88 years old Eduardo come by and showed us how it’s really done! In an hour or so he got more of the plot cleared than the two of us together had managed in much more time!

If you think you are too old for something, you really should meet Eduardo, who also happens to have the biggest allotment in our little gardening community!

So, at the end of the day, the three of us managed to weed around half of the plot and prepare a quarter of it for sowing/planting.

Today

I set out in the morning to plant/sow in the now prepared soil. So far I have done: Strawberry and chives (transplanted from last years balcony gardening) and rocket salad/rucola, carrots, radishes and potatoes. As for the big potato plant in the picture, it has been pre-grown on the balcony πŸ˜‰

Tomorrow

Tomorrow afternoon I will go down to finish weeding around the rose bush and then planting herbs (rosemary, lavender and parsley) around it.

Hopefully by tomorrow 50% of the allotment will be planted/sown and ready to produce a lot of healthy food for both me and my neighbours!

Personally

I have to say that even that I knew already that (balcony) gardening was good for me, I never imagined what a huge, positive impact the allotment would have on my mental health. In short, in just two days I went from β€œThank God I don’t have to leave the flat today to run errands!” to β€œSun, when are you finally getting up so that I can go out gardening?”.

This allotment truly has become my happy place …

Accountability

First of all, I should have written this blog post much, much earlier! But better late then never, as the saying goes. The reason I didn’t do so earlier is twofold: One is ‘brain fog’ and the other is that the whole ‘neighbourhood pantry’ thing developed so slowly and steadily that I actually never really thought about reporting where and how the donations are used that I have received for it.

I promise to do better in future! From now on I will post every beginning of the month how much I have received in donations, how and for what it was spent and keep all the receipts. I really don’t have the time, energy and concentration to do this retrospective, sorry. What I can do is giving you a quick breakdown and attach to this post my shopping bill for this week.

Weekly shopping: Typically around 120-140 Euros, sometimes more, rarely less. This is all the usual food staples plus basic hygiene and cleaning materiel. I do this online and get it delivered as it is far too heavy for me to carry. A few items, if look at the list, are clearly for me, but I have deducted that already from the amount I wrote above.

This is how the house entrance looks beginning of each week …

Weekly fruit&vegetable box: 19 Euros, I don’t get a receipt for this, but will ask for a monthly one in future. My own fruit and vegetables, I buy separately.

Also, my own food stuff etc is in the kitchen, and food and other things for the pantry are in my storage/roundabout room.

1 – 2/month help for one family to buy gas to cook with, 18,75 Euros per bottle. It doesn’t make sense to give people food that they then can’t cook … and yes, I get a receipt, will keep that in future.

Additional shopping, that I do on foot and locally as some things are cheaper and/or only available in my local supermarket and not in the one I use for ‘online’ shopping. I also use it to stock up if I have run out of something important earlier then expected. Difficult to say how much it’s, I would guess between 50 and 100 Euros/month. Again, from today on I will keep the receipts.

There is the very occasional ’emergency’ request and equally the very occasional drop-in from somebody else, outside the families, but that is small stuff. But, once again, if that happens in future, I will make a note.

So, that is basically what I spend monthly to help four families (~16 people) to get through this challenging times. Bearing in mind fluctuations in need and prices around 700 Euros/month. Food prices have already risen here in Europe and are expected to rise further due to the war in Ukraine.

Thank you for reading this far, here the link to the PDF of this weeks shopping bill.

Please expect a more detailed blog post with receipts like this beginning of each months, this keeps me accountable and you know where the money goes to. If you have any comments, questions or would like more information about something, please put them in a comment. And if you come to Santiago, I am happily showing you around, just give me a bit of notice so that I am at home and not in the allotment πŸ˜‰

Sunflowers and Food Insecurity

I didn’t think I would post again so soon, but this is a great article that explains very well why food prices, and therefore also food insecurity, will increase further over the coming months, both here in Spain and worldwide. I have added some notes in [and in italics] to explain certain points and give my thoughts. Source to the article, in Spanish, at the end.

Distribution chains start rationing sunflower oil.

62% of the sunflower oil imported by Spain comes from Ukraine. With the Black Sea ports closed, uncertainty covers the markets and, despite the calls for calm from the Minister of Agriculture, Luis Planas, who said the day before yesterday that “there would be no problems of shortages in the short term”, many consumers have rushed to the supermarket to stock up on sunflower oil. [Sunflower oil is often used by people on a tight budget to replace the much preferred olive oil as it is far cheaper than the later.]

The increase in demand and the supply difficulties of the distribution chains have led some of them to begin to rationalize their stocks. Makro, a chain that supplies a large part of the hotel and catering industry, has limited olive oil [A secondary effect, those who can afford olive oil are now also stocking up on it out of fear the shortage of sunflower oil will also cause, in the long term, a shortage of olive oil or at least an increase in its price.] to one unit per customer per day, as confirmed by the company. And Mercadona says it has limited it to five liters per customer, while the Eroski chain has already begun to hang posters in its stores indicating that it will only give a maximum of two boxes per customer per day of this product.

Key country for cereals

Ukraine is the breadbasket of Europe. Last year it increased its cereal production by 32% to 85.7 million tons. These data are reason enough to explain why the Russian attack on this country located on the Black Sea coast has broken the market. “The uncertainty of the last days is over, now the market is broken”, pointed out a few days ago the president of the Grain and Oilseeds Trade Association (Accoe), Marcos MartΓ­nez, who added: “We don’t know where the prices of these raw materials are going to reach”.

The cereal market is moving at the pace set by the war news and the movements that may or may not take place in its ports. One of the problems is that Spain has a corn deficit. In fact, it buys from Ukraine between 28 and 30 % of the corn it needs for animal feed. [Which means dairy and meat prices will also go up.]

As for wheat, Ukraine is the world’s fifth largest trader, a ranking led by the Russians. The blockade of the ports means increased dependence on South American grain production, a harvest that has not yet begun. [Which means bread prices, and those of other products that are elaborated with wheat, will also go up.]

Ukraine conflict adds fuel to the fire of the dairy crisis.

There is a place near the sea where, from time to time, large mountains of corn are formed that diminish in size as the trucks carry the raw material to the feed mills. That place is the outer port of Punta Langosteira, in Arteixo, one of the gateways of entry of Ukrainian grain in Spain. According to data handled by the Galician Association of Compound Food Manufacturers (Agafac), during the first two months of this year about 290,000 tons of corn grown in that country have entered Galicia through the dock in A CoruΓ±a and the port of MarΓ­n.

Because Ukraine produces 15% of the world’s corn, Spain, which has a corn deficit, buys around 30% of its total volume of imports of this cereal. And it arrives through the ports of Tarragona, Cartagena, Huelva, MarΓ­n or Arteixo. Something similar happens with wheat, a cereal of which this state accumulates 30 % of the world production, while Russia occupies the first place in the ranking. As with corn, part of it also enters through Galicia. So far this year, for example, have been unloaded at the ports of Punta Langosteira and Marin about 30,000 tons, but next week is expected to unload another ship loaded with about 60,000 tons of Ukrainian wheat. [And after that, unless other ships loaded with grains are still at sea, this source of food will dry up completely unless a major miracle happens …]

Source: https://www.lavozdegalicia.es/noticia/somosagro/agricultura/2022/03/04/cadenas-distribucion-comienzan-racionalizar-aceite-girasol/00031646422161080654928.htm